I wrote this for our Friends

As Rich as We Want To Be

As I strapped myself in for a short trip in the car, I turned on the radio.  The man on the radio was talking about our new president.  He said that the new man on the job had a lot of public trust capital.

I got a little intrigued, thinking how fortuitous, in an “economic downturn”, we can now start thinking about something rather than greenbacks as being forms of capital.  That might be just what we all need!  A little joy came across my face.

The timing couldn’t be better, maybe even as we collectively as a nation feel ourselves buying less, could we start feeling wealthier if we just took stock of all the valuable things we have that aren’t a number in an account?

I thought that maybe in America we would start to see that money isn’t where wealth begins and ends.

What if we did started to measure well-being, charity or joy as opposed to money?  How would that look?  Can you imagine, along with the NASDAQ hearing about indices that had something, anything to do with genuine happiness?

But my pragmatic side kept my feet firmly planted on the ground.

If trust can be a form of capital (even on the radio news), than maybe the notion that friendships, community, love, and a whole bevy of other precious intangibles could be recognized for the value they had as well.  Imagine the shift in our culture if cold hard news reported consistently from an angle that saw the true capital in these untouchable treasures?

As I rolled these thoughts over in my head, wondering on whether they were possible or just fluff, I thought of all the things that are as valuable as money, but sometimes they don’t get the level of scrutiny that the stock market gives to the capital we count objectively.

Having had enough years and experiences of poverty, at this juncture I find myself wealthier than ever before.  We don’t have many trappings of financial wealth, but for the first time I get to enjoy capital of a different kind.

Kinds of wealth, not necessarily green

Friendships are perhaps the most undervalued currency in our culture today.  I learned the meaning of friendship not stateside with my school friends, but in another country where without friendships, the likelihood of hunger was fairly real.  A distinct thing about the friendships I saw when I was in Russia was that they weren’t bonds forged of convenience, which soon dissipated when the convenience was gone.  The friendships there seemed to withstand trials, tears, and hardships.  People actually bore each other’s burdens.  They didn’t do it once and then say “this person is too needy” and distance themselves; they did it because that’s just what a decent person did.  They didn’t flee a friend when their life got messy or unseemly, instead, they came closer.  What a concept.  Friendships were an investment, only instead of money; they were an investment of time and well, love.

Community is yet another undervalued precious intangible.  How to put a dollar amount on the value of people who help you in those less than perfect circumstances in life?  How to estimate the joy in a party with friends?  How to appraise the value of a group of people who work together to help ones without safety nets?  Community is a wealth that we are called to as Christians but even without the faith aspect, is a quality of life asset that can’t be gotten at a big box store.  The presence of community is precious, altogether too rare and a wealth that can’t be traded publicly.

Health is another form of capital.  It shouldn’t be taken for granted, but it is.  How often does a person wake up grateful that their brains and bodies are all functioning soundly?  Maybe we do after recuperating from a flu or from something much more threatening, but often times, we walk around not really being particularly grateful to be able to do the things we want to do.  We do realize it though the minute our health starts to look threatened.

What other forms of capital can you think of in your life?  Laughter? Music?  Good conversation?  Consider the things in a day that bring joy that cannot be purchased.  Counting your dollars might be considered a vain activity, but counting the valuable items that cannot be bought in our lives will only make us feel richer than before we began.

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As Rich as We Want To Be

 

 

As I strapped myself in for a short trip in the car, I turned on the radio.  The man on the radio was talking about our new president.  He said that the new man on the job had a lot of public trust capital. 

 

I got a little intrigued, thinking how fortuitous, in an “economic downturn”, we can now start thinking about something rather than greenbacks as being forms of capital.  That might be just what we all need!  A little joy came across my face.

 

The timing couldn’t be better, maybe even as we collectively as a nation feel ourselves buying less, could we start feeling wealthier if we just took stock of all the valuable things we have that aren’t a number in an account?

 

I thought that maybe in America we would start to see that money isn’t where wealth begins and ends. 

 

What if we did started to measure well-being, charity or joy as opposed to money?  How would that look?  Can you imagine, along with the NASDAQ hearing about indices that had something, anything to do with genuine happiness?

 

But my pragmatic side kept my feet firmly planted on the ground.

 

If trust can be a form of capital (even on the radio news), than maybe the notion that friendships, community, love, and a whole bevy of other precious intangibles could be recognized for the value they had as well.  Imagine the shift in our culture if cold hard news reported consistently from an angle that saw the true capital in these untouchable treasures?

 

As I rolled these thoughts over in my head, wondering on whether they were possible or just clouds, I thought of all the things that are as valuable as money, but sometimes they don’t get the level of scrutiny that the stock market gives to the capital we count objectively.

 

Having had enough years and experiences of poverty, at this juncture I find myself wealthier than ever before.  We don’t have many trappings of financial wealth, but for the first time I get to enjoy capital of a different kind. 

 

Kinds of wealth, not necessarily green

 

Friendships are perhaps the most undervalued currency in our culture today.  I learned the meaning of friendship not stateside with my school friends, but in another country where without friendships, the likelihood of hunger was fairly real.  A distinct thing about the friendships I saw when I was in Russia was that they weren’t bonds forged of convenience, which soon dissipated when the convenience was gone.  The friendships there seemed to withstand trials, tears, and hardships.  People actually bore each other’s burdens.  They didn’t do it once and then say “this person is too needy” and distance themselves; they did it because that’s just what a decent person did.  They didn’t flee a friend when their life got messy or unseemly, instead, they came closer.  What a concept.  Friendships were an investment, only instead of money; they were an investment of time and well, love.

 

Community is yet another undervalued precious intangible.  How to put a dollar amount on the value of people who help you in those less than perfect circumstances in life?  How to estimate the joy in a party with friends?  How to appraise the value of a group of people who work together to help ones without safety nets?  Community is a wealth that we are called to as Christians but even without the faith aspect, is a quality of life asset that can’t be gotten at a big box store.  The presence of community is precious, altogether too rare and a wealth that can’t be traded publicly.

 

Health is another form of capital.  It shouldn’t be taken for granted, but it is.  How often does a person wake up grateful that their brains and bodies are all functioning soundly?  Maybe we do after recuperating from a flu or from something much more threatening, but often times, we walk around not really being particularly grateful to be able to do the things we want to do.  We do realize it though the minute our health starts to look threatened.

 

What other forms of capital can you think of in your life?  Laughter? Music?  Good conversation?  Consider the things in a day that bring joy that cannot be purchased.  Counting your dollars might be considered a vain activity, but counting the valuable items that cannot be bought in our lives will only make us feel richer than before we began.

As Rich as We Want To Be

 

 

As I strapped myself in for a short trip in the car, I turned on the radio.  The man on the radio was talking about our new president.  He said that the new man on the job had a lot of public trust capital. 

 

I got a little intrigued, thinking how fortuitous, in an “economic downturn”, we can now start thinking about something rather than greenbacks as being forms of capital.  That might be just what we all need!  A little joy came across my face.

 

The timing couldn’t be better, maybe even as we collectively as a nation feel ourselves buying less, could we start feeling wealthier if we just took stock of all the valuable things we have that aren’t a number in an account?

 

I thought that maybe in America we would start to see that money isn’t where wealth begins and ends. 

 

What if we did started to measure well-being, charity or joy as opposed to money?  How would that look?  Can you imagine, along with the NASDAQ hearing about indices that had something, anything to do with genuine happiness?

 

But my pragmatic side kept my feet firmly planted on the ground.

 

If trust can be a form of capital (even on the radio news), than maybe the notion that friendships, community, love, and a whole bevy of other precious intangibles could be recognized for the value they had as well.  Imagine the shift in our culture if cold hard news reported consistently from an angle that saw the true capital in these untouchable treasures?

 

As I rolled these thoughts over in my head, wondering on whether they were possible or just clouds, I thought of all the things that are as valuable as money, but sometimes they don’t get the level of scrutiny that the stock market gives to the capital we count objectively.

 

Having had enough years and experiences of poverty, at this juncture I find myself wealthier than ever before.  We don’t have many trappings of financial wealth, but for the first time I get to enjoy capital of a different kind. 

 

Kinds of wealth, not necessarily green

 

Friendships are perhaps the most undervalued currency in our culture today.  I learned the meaning of friendship not stateside with my school friends, but in another country where without friendships, the likelihood of hunger was fairly real.  A distinct thing about the friendships I saw when I was in Russia was that they weren’t bonds forged of convenience, which soon dissipated when the convenience was gone.  The friendships there seemed to withstand trials, tears, and hardships.  People actually bore each other’s burdens.  They didn’t do it once and then say “this person is too needy” and distance themselves; they did it because that’s just what a decent person did.  They didn’t flee a friend when their life got messy or unseemly, instead, they came closer.  What a concept.  Friendships were an investment, only instead of money; they were an investment of time and well, love.

 

Community is yet another undervalued precious intangible.  How to put a dollar amount on the value of people who help you in those less than perfect circumstances in life?  How to estimate the joy in a party with friends?  How to appraise the value of a group of people who work together to help ones without safety nets?  Community is a wealth that we are called to as Christians but even without the faith aspect, is a quality of life asset that can’t be gotten at a big box store.  The presence of community is precious, altogether too rare and a wealth that can’t be traded publicly.

 

Health is another form of capital.  It shouldn’t be taken for granted, but it is.  How often does a person wake up grateful that their brains and bodies are all functioning soundly?  Maybe we do after recuperating from a flu or from something much more threatening, but often times, we walk around not really being particularly grateful to be able to do the things we want to do.  We do realize it though the minute our health starts to look threatened.

 

What other forms of capital can you think of in your life?  Laughter? Music?  Good conversation?  Consider the things in a day that bring joy that cannot be purchased.  Counting your dollars might be considered a vain activity, but counting the valuable items that cannot be bought in our lives will only make us feel richer than before we began.

As Rich as We Want To Be

 

 

As I strapped myself in for a short trip in the car, I turned on the radio.  The man on the radio was talking about our new president.  He said that the new man on the job had a lot of public trust capital. 

 

I got a little intrigued, thinking how fortuitous, in an “economic downturn”, we can now start thinking about something rather than greenbacks as being forms of capital.  That might be just what we all need!  A little joy came across my face.

 

The timing couldn’t be better, maybe even as we collectively as a nation feel ourselves buying less, could we start feeling wealthier if we just took stock of all the valuable things we have that aren’t a number in an account?

 

I thought that maybe in America we would start to see that money isn’t where wealth begins and ends. 

 

What if we did started to measure well-being, charity or joy as opposed to money?  How would that look?  Can you imagine, along with the NASDAQ hearing about indices that had something, anything to do with genuine happiness?

 

But my pragmatic side kept my feet firmly planted on the ground.

 

If trust can be a form of capital (even on the radio news), than maybe the notion that friendships, community, love, and a whole bevy of other precious intangibles could be recognized for the value they had as well.  Imagine the shift in our culture if cold hard news reported consistently from an angle that saw the true capital in these untouchable treasures?

 

As I rolled these thoughts over in my head, wondering on whether they were possible or just clouds, I thought of all the things that are as valuable as money, but sometimes they don’t get the level of scrutiny that the stock market gives to the capital we count objectively.

 

Having had enough years and experiences of poverty, at this juncture I find myself wealthier than ever before.  We don’t have many trappings of financial wealth, but for the first time I get to enjoy capital of a different kind. 

 

Kinds of wealth, not necessarily green

 

Friendships are perhaps the most undervalued currency in our culture today.  I learned the meaning of friendship not stateside with my school friends, but in another country where without friendships, the likelihood of hunger was fairly real.  A distinct thing about the friendships I saw when I was in Russia was that they weren’t bonds forged of convenience, which soon dissipated when the convenience was gone.  The friendships there seemed to withstand trials, tears, and hardships.  People actually bore each other’s burdens.  They didn’t do it once and then say “this person is too needy” and distance themselves; they did it because that’s just what a decent person did.  They didn’t flee a friend when their life got messy or unseemly, instead, they came closer.  What a concept.  Friendships were an investment, only instead of money; they were an investment of time and well, love.

 

Community is yet another undervalued precious intangible.  How to put a dollar amount on the value of people who help you in those less than perfect circumstances in life?  How to estimate the joy in a party with friends?  How to appraise the value of a group of people who work together to help ones without safety nets?  Community is a wealth that we are called to as Christians but even without the faith aspect, is a quality of life asset that can’t be gotten at a big box store.  The presence of community is precious, altogether too rare and a wealth that can’t be traded publicly.

 

Health is another form of capital.  It shouldn’t be taken for granted, but it is.  How often does a person wake up grateful that their brains and bodies are all functioning soundly?  Maybe we do after recuperating from a flu or from something much more threatening, but often times, we walk around not really being particularly grateful to be able to do the things we want to do.  We do realize it though the minute our health starts to look threatened.

 

What other forms of capital can you think of in your life?  Laughter? Music?  Good conversation?  Consider the things in a day that bring joy that cannot be purchased.  Counting your dollars might be considered a vain activity, but counting the valuable items that cannot be bought in our lives will only make us feel richer than before we began.

As Rich as We Want To Be

 

 

As I strapped myself in for a short trip in the car, I turned on the radio.  The man on the radio was talking about our new president.  He said that the new man on the job had a lot of public trust capital. 

 

I got a little intrigued, thinking how fortuitous, in an “economic downturn”, we can now start thinking about something rather than greenbacks as being forms of capital.  That might be just what we all need!  A little joy came across my face.

 

The timing couldn’t be better, maybe even as we collectively as a nation feel ourselves buying less, could we start feeling wealthier if we just took stock of all the valuable things we have that aren’t a number in an account?

 

I thought that maybe in America we would start to see that money isn’t where wealth begins and ends. 

 

What if we did started to measure well-being, charity or joy as opposed to money?  How would that look?  Can you imagine, along with the NASDAQ hearing about indices that had something, anything to do with genuine happiness?

 

But my pragmatic side kept my feet firmly planted on the ground.

 

If trust can be a form of capital (even on the radio news), than maybe the notion that friendships, community, love, and a whole bevy of other precious intangibles could be recognized for the value they had as well.  Imagine the shift in our culture if cold hard news reported consistently from an angle that saw the true capital in these untouchable treasures?

 

As I rolled these thoughts over in my head, wondering on whether they were possible or just clouds, I thought of all the things that are as valuable as money, but sometimes they don’t get the level of scrutiny that the stock market gives to the capital we count objectively.

 

Having had enough years and experiences of poverty, at this juncture I find myself wealthier than ever before.  We don’t have many trappings of financial wealth, but for the first time I get to enjoy capital of a different kind. 

 

Kinds of wealth, not necessarily green

 

Friendships are perhaps the most undervalued currency in our culture today.  I learned the meaning of friendship not stateside with my school friends, but in another country where without friendships, the likelihood of hunger was fairly real.  A distinct thing about the friendships I saw when I was in Russia was that they weren’t bonds forged of convenience, which soon dissipated when the convenience was gone.  The friendships there seemed to withstand trials, tears, and hardships.  People actually bore each other’s burdens.  They didn’t do it once and then say “this person is too needy” and distance themselves; they did it because that’s just what a decent person did.  They didn’t flee a friend when their life got messy or unseemly, instead, they came closer.  What a concept.  Friendships were an investment, only instead of money; they were an investment of time and well, love.

 

Community is yet another undervalued precious intangible.  How to put a dollar amount on the value of people who help you in those less than perfect circumstances in life?  How to estimate the joy in a party with friends?  How to appraise the value of a group of people who work together to help ones without safety nets?  Community is a wealth that we are called to as Christians but even without the faith aspect, is a quality of life asset that can’t be gotten at a big box store.  The presence of community is precious, altogether too rare and a wealth that can’t be traded publicly.

 

Health is another form of capital.  It shouldn’t be taken for granted, but it is.  How often does a person wake up grateful that their brains and bodies are all functioning soundly?  Maybe we do after recuperating from a flu or from something much more threatening, but often times, we walk around not really being particularly grateful to be able to do the things we want to do.  We do realize it though the minute our health starts to look threatened.

 

What other forms of capital can you think of in your life?  Laughter? Music?  Good conversation?  Consider the things in a day that bring joy that cannot be purchased.  Counting your dollars might be considered a vain activity, but counting the valuable items that cannot be bought in our lives will only make us feel richer than before we began.

As Rich as We Want To Be

 

 

As I strapped myself in for a short trip in the car, I turned on the radio.  The man on the radio was talking about our new president.  He said that the new man on the job had a lot of public trust capital. 

 

I got a little intrigued, thinking how fortuitous, in an “economic downturn”, we can now start thinking about something rather than greenbacks as being forms of capital.  That might be just what we all need!  A little joy came across my face.

 

The timing couldn’t be better, maybe even as we collectively as a nation feel ourselves buying less, could we start feeling wealthier if we just took stock of all the valuable things we have that aren’t a number in an account?

 

I thought that maybe in America we would start to see that money isn’t where wealth begins and ends. 

 

What if we did started to measure well-being, charity or joy as opposed to money?  How would that look?  Can you imagine, along with the NASDAQ hearing about indices that had something, anything to do with genuine happiness?

 

But my pragmatic side kept my feet firmly planted on the ground.

 

If trust can be a form of capital (even on the radio news), than maybe the notion that friendships, community, love, and a whole bevy of other precious intangibles could be recognized for the value they had as well.  Imagine the shift in our culture if cold hard news reported consistently from an angle that saw the true capital in these untouchable treasures?

 

As I rolled these thoughts over in my head, wondering on whether they were possible or just clouds, I thought of all the things that are as valuable as money, but sometimes they don’t get the level of scrutiny that the stock market gives to the capital we count objectively.

 

Having had enough years and experiences of poverty, at this juncture I find myself wealthier than ever before.  We don’t have many trappings of financial wealth, but for the first time I get to enjoy capital of a different kind. 

 

Kinds of wealth, not necessarily green

 

Friendships are perhaps the most undervalued currency in our culture today.  I learned the meaning of friendship not stateside with my school friends, but in another country where without friendships, the likelihood of hunger was fairly real.  A distinct thing about the friendships I saw when I was in Russia was that they weren’t bonds forged of convenience, which soon dissipated when the convenience was gone.  The friendships there seemed to withstand trials, tears, and hardships.  People actually bore each other’s burdens.  They didn’t do it once and then say “this person is too needy” and distance themselves; they did it because that’s just what a decent person did.  They didn’t flee a friend when their life got messy or unseemly, instead, they came closer.  What a concept.  Friendships were an investment, only instead of money; they were an investment of time and well, love.

 

Community is yet another undervalued precious intangible.  How to put a dollar amount on the value of people who help you in those less than perfect circumstances in life?  How to estimate the joy in a party with friends?  How to appraise the value of a group of people who work together to help ones without safety nets?  Community is a wealth that we are called to as Christians but even without the faith aspect, is a quality of life asset that can’t be gotten at a big box store.  The presence of community is precious, altogether too rare and a wealth that can’t be traded publicly.

 

Health is another form of capital.  It shouldn’t be taken for granted, but it is.  How often does a person wake up grateful that their brains and bodies are all functioning soundly?  Maybe we do after recuperating from a flu or from something much more threatening, but often times, we walk around not really being particularly grateful to be able to do the things we want to do.  We do realize it though the minute our health starts to look threatened.

 

What other forms of capital can you think of in your life?  Laughter? Music?  Good conversation?  Consider the things in a day that bring joy that cannot be purchased.  Counting your dollars might be considered a vain activity, but counting the valuable items that cannot be bought in our lives will only make us feel richer than before we began.

As Rich as We Want To Be

 

 

As I strapped myself in for a short trip in the car, I turned on the radio.  The man on the radio was talking about our new president.  He said that the new man on the job had a lot of public trust capital. 

 

I got a little intrigued, thinking how fortuitous, in an “economic downturn”, we can now start thinking about something rather than greenbacks as being forms of capital.  That might be just what we all need!  A little joy came across my face.

 

The timing couldn’t be better, maybe even as we collectively as a nation feel ourselves buying less, could we start feeling wealthier if we just took stock of all the valuable things we have that aren’t a number in an account?

 

I thought that maybe in America we would start to see that money isn’t where wealth begins and ends. 

 

What if we did started to measure well-being, charity or joy as opposed to money?  How would that look?  Can you imagine, along with the NASDAQ hearing about indices that had something, anything to do with genuine happiness?

 

But my pragmatic side kept my feet firmly planted on the ground.

 

If trust can be a form of capital (even on the radio news), than maybe the notion that friendships, community, love, and a whole bevy of other precious intangibles could be recognized for the value they had as well.  Imagine the shift in our culture if cold hard news reported consistently from an angle that saw the true capital in these untouchable treasures?

 

As I rolled these thoughts over in my head, wondering on whether they were possible or just clouds, I thought of all the things that are as valuable as money, but sometimes they don’t get the level of scrutiny that the stock market gives to the capital we count objectively.

 

Having had enough years and experiences of poverty, at this juncture I find myself wealthier than ever before.  We don’t have many trappings of financial wealth, but for the first time I get to enjoy capital of a different kind. 

 

Kinds of wealth, not necessarily green

 

Friendships are perhaps the most undervalued currency in our culture today.  I learned the meaning of friendship not stateside with my school friends, but in another country where without friendships, the likelihood of hunger was fairly real.  A distinct thing about the friendships I saw when I was in Russia was that they weren’t bonds forged of convenience, which soon dissipated when the convenience was gone.  The friendships there seemed to withstand trials, tears, and hardships.  People actually bore each other’s burdens.  They didn’t do it once and then say “this person is too needy” and distance themselves; they did it because that’s just what a decent person did.  They didn’t flee a friend when their life got messy or unseemly, instead, they came closer.  What a concept.  Friendships were an investment, only instead of money; they were an investment of time and well, love.

 

Community is yet another undervalued precious intangible.  How to put a dollar amount on the value of people who help you in those less than perfect circumstances in life?  How to estimate the joy in a party with friends?  How to appraise the value of a group of people who work together to help ones without safety nets?  Community is a wealth that we are called to as Christians but even without the faith aspect, is a quality of life asset that can’t be gotten at a big box store.  The presence of community is precious, altogether too rare and a wealth that can’t be traded publicly.

 

Health is another form of capital.  It shouldn’t be taken for granted, but it is.  How often does a person wake up grateful that their brains and bodies are all functioning soundly?  Maybe we do after recuperating from a flu or from something much more threatening, but often times, we walk around not really being particularly grateful to be able to do the things we want to do.  We do realize it though the minute our health starts to look threatened.

 

What other forms of capital can you think of in your life?  Laughter? Music?  Good conversation?  Consider the things in a day that bring joy that cannot be purchased.  Counting your dollars might be considered a vain activity, but counting the valuable items that cannot be bought in our lives will only make us feel richer than before we began.

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4 Comments Add yours

  1. Zhenya says:

    Family might be a basic but a crucial one. There are enough cliches that speak of the value of it but I often take for granted having grown up in an intact home and having one of my own. Thanks for having me ponder on my intangibles.

  2. Grandma Pumpkin says:

    FAMILY:
    Zhenya beat me to it. Grateful to have been raised in a good, caring, home. Taught to work hard, love God, learn to do without and not complain. Thankful for a good husband and 2 sons. Thrilled to have 7 loving grandchildren. Beautiful,talented daughter-in-law who loves my son…gave him 2 adorable girls.

    CHURCH FAMILY:
    Caring, loyal friends who faithfully pray for me & my family. A teaching pastor. Meaning ful music. Valuable Bible study.

  3. AprilMay says:

    Beautiful post! I agree with family, church, God, and everything you wrote…especially health! This did make me feel better…I am truly rich. Thank you!

  4. admin says:

    hooray! I actually had you in mind a bit when I wrote it, AprilMay.

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